Curling Position Guidelines

Curling Position Guidelines

The following guidelines are intended to provide you with a brief overview of
curling rules and etiquette by position. The outline below can give you a starting
point to rate and improve your curling skills.

THE LEAD

As a lead, you set the pace of the end. Your draw weight is important.

Skills:

  • Develop a good delivery.
  • Learn to get the stones in play.
  • Learn to throw draw weight.
  • Aim for the skip's broom: keep your eyes on the broom during your delivery.
  • Develop an effective sweeping technique.
  • Know what "in" and "out" turns are.
  • Learn to "Pick up" sweeping when a rock looks slow; don't be afraid to
    oversweep - your skip will tell you to stop.

Rules & Etiquette:

  • Stand behind the house when it is your turn to throw the stone.
  • You can sweep your team's rock to (but not past) the opposite tee line.
  • Stand still at the side of your sheet while the opposing team is throwing
    their stones so as not to obstruct their view of the skip's broom or distract
    them.
  • If you touch the stone with your broom while sweeping (or anytime you touch
    a stone), you must call the foul.
  • Help newer curlers understand skip's call & the rules.
  • Traditionally, you will throw the first set of stones.
  • Traditionally, you sweep the second's, vice's and skip's stones.
  • Stand beyond the nearest hog line until it's your turn to sweep

THE SECOND

Seconds are often asked to make "take-outs".

Skills:

  • Develop a comfortable "take-out" delivery.
  • Learn to adjust your weight from draw to take-out and vise versa.
  • Be able to pick-up sweeping on slow rocks.
  • Have an effective sweeping technique.
  • Concentrate on your delivery: when throwing the heavier take-out rocks,
    make certain you concentrate on your form and not on pushing the rock.
  • Know the in- & out- turns.
  • Hit the skip's broom regularly.

Rules & Etiquette:

  • Stand behind the house only when it is your turn to throw a stone.
  • You can sweep your teammates' rocks to (but not past) the opposite tee line.
  • Stand still at the side of your sheet while the opposing team is throwing
    their Stones so as not to obstruct their view of the skip's broom or distract
    them.
  • If you touch with your broom while sweeping (or anytime you touch a stone),
    you must call the foul.
  • Traditionally, you throw the second set of stones.
  • Traditionally, you sweep the lead's, vice's and skip's stones.
  • Stand beyond the nearest hog line until it's your turn to sweep.

THE VICE (or THIRD)

The vice must be able to hit the broom, make either draw or take-out, and be
able to call sweeping (read the ice) on the skip's stone.

Skills:

  • Have a good delivery.
  • Hit the broom.
  • Call sweeping (Don't be shy!).
  • Be able to adjust weight to make a draw or take-out.
  • Learn the strategy of the game.
  • Have a good sweeping technique.

Rules & Etiquette:

  • Stand behind the house only when it is your turn to throw the stone or
    when you will be acting skip.
  • You can sweep your team's rock to (but not past) the opposite tee line.
  • You may sweep past the tee only when you are acting skip.
  • Stand still at the side of your sheet while the opposing team is throwing
    their stones so as not to obstruct their view of the skip's broom or distract
    them.
  • If you touch the stone with your broom while sweeping (or anytime you touch
    a stone), you must call foul.
  • The vice-skip takes charge of the house when the skip throws his or her
    stones.
  • Do not block the opposing skip, or acting skip, from sweeping behind the
    tee. He or she has priority on opposing team's rocks, but can't keep you from
    sweeping if he or she decides not to.
  • When in the house, keep still while the opposing team throws their rocks.
    For the best view of the ice, stand behind the opposing skip or ice. This
    way you will see how much the rocks are curling. Watching the ice throughout
    the game makes sweeping calls easier.
  • You call sweep on the skip's rocks - you have the best view of the house.
    Help newer curlers understand the skip's call & rules.
  • Traditionally, you will sweep the lead's & second's rocks.
  • Traditionally, you will throw the third set of stones.

THE SKIP

You are the Strategist & the Hammer. You call the strategy of the game and are expected to make the shot (s) that put it all together.

Skills:

  • Hit the broom.
  • Have a good delivery.
  • Call the shots for the game - set the strategy.
  • Understand the basic strategies: If you have the last rock (hammer), you
    want the front clear so you will have an open last shot.
  • If your team throws first, clutter the front to prevent the opposing skip
    from scoring with the last rock.
  • Call sweeping.
  • Adjust weight to make draw, guard or take-out.
  • Give correct broom for the shot being called.
  • Be able to focus and perform under pressure - believe in yourself!

Rules & Etiquette:

  • Stand behind the house only when it is your turn to throw the stone or
    when you will be acting skip.
  • The skip has exclusive direction of the game for his or her team.

  • The skip may throw stones other than the last two (2).
  • Do not block the opposing skip from sweeping behind the tee when you are
    not "taking" a rock.
  • When in the house, keep still while opposing team is throwing their rocks.
  • Be sensitive to your team: give encouragement and support them.
  • Keep the team informed. Let them know what shot you are calling for, so
    they can pick up sweeping.

Curling is a team sport. It requires
communication and teamwork.

Remember, no one player wins or loses the game.

Hints

  1. Clean the bottom of your stone and the ice immediately in front of you
    before delivering the stone.
  2. Be sure you know what your skip wants.
  3. Do not speak to your opponents when they are ready to play. Let them
    concentrate.
  4. Do not cross the ice when there is a player in the hack.
  5. Any member of the rink (team) should feel free to discuss strategy with
    his/her skip before or after (not during) a game. It helps the skip and the
    rink if all members understand the strategy and in particular, their skip's
    strategy, which may change during the game.
  6. When skipping, stand still and keep your broom behind you while the
    opposing skip is directing the play of his/her stones. Do not destroy the
    morale of a player by criticism.
  7. Watch you opponents deliver their rocks to learn speed, swing, or falls
    in the ice. A great challenge in curling is learning how to read the ice.
    See if you notice any changes throughout the game. You'll be surprised.
  8. Remember the spirit of curling: give recognition when good shots are
    made and do not cheer at your opponent's missed shots.